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Education reform - broadening horizons

PostPosted:Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:46 am
by ryandunl
education reform is and has been a priority in at least US Politics, if not politics all over the world. In short, one issue that is too narrowly discussed in public forums, if discussed at all, is the subjects taught, the curriculum itself. Take Physical Education, for instance. A ubiquitous program that exists for a number of reasons, exercise itself, safety while exercising, teamwork. Students tend to learn a lot about sports, weightlifting, and the time it takes them to run a mile, climb a rope, and get a presidential fitness award signed by the Governator (I suppose that tells you how old I am). I played Frisbee football, Pitch (the card game), and bloodball, which was a rugby-like sport with a soccer ball, full contact on the gym floor. I have no idea why we did that. Why do that when kids could be learning far more valuable skills in PE? Ballroom dance for instance, or Parkour, or a martial art such as aikido, jiu-jitsu, krav maga, or a host of others? I realize that dance, for instance, is already taught in some schools. I learned how to line dance in 4th grade (I'm not glad they chose to teach me line dancing), but if we're talking about improving education, the first priority should be what we're teaching and what more can be taught, and providing funding for more diverse curriculum.

I'm sure other professionals could offer their ideas as to subjects that could easily be offered in schools. For instance, some schools offer Sociology classes as part of their social studies program, but none to my knowledge offer Anthropology classes, which would essentially offer sociology on a multicultural level, and be just as easy to acquire as an extra certification for world history teachers as sociology is for U.S. Teachers (I know thats how my teacher got to teach Sociology).

Reward: Free.