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kitchen sponge sanitizer

PostPosted:Wed Dec 21, 2005 1:18 am
by Jolinda
All the experts say that the average kitchen sponge is filled with germs that then spread to wherever you use the sponge. I envision a device that holds sanitizing liquid with a slot on top to hold the sponge. Then at the end of each day, you submerge the sponge into the vat of sanitizing liquid for a set amount of time, then bring it back up and let it dry overnight before using the next day.

Re: kitchen sponge sanitizer

PostPosted:Wed Jan 25, 2006 1:49 am
by franis
Jolinda wrote:All the experts say that the average kitchen sponge is filled with germs that then spread to wherever you use the sponge. I envision a device that holds sanitizing liquid with a slot on top to hold the sponge. Then at the end of each day, you submerge the sponge into the vat of sanitizing liquid for a set amount of time, then bring it back up and let it dry overnight before using the next day.


Yeah, the trouble with filling the sink up with bleach and submersing the sponge is it makes the sponge fall apart almost instantly. So another cleaning fluid marketed for that purpose would be attractive.
Having a special device to put it in is a sort of fru-fru because you can always use your dishpan if you have the cleaning fluid. In fact, if it sanitizes the sponge, why not the loofa, the kitchen washcloth & even the toilet brush!

PostPosted:Sat Mar 11, 2006 6:21 pm
by C-Chamberlain
Weather it's worth noting or not is up to debate but I have the problem in my house of "stinky dish rag." Where the rag has been used, left damp and became mildewy. I have found a temporary solution, which would work with the sponge issue as well, is to get it all lathered up in some antibacterial soap. We have a little bottle (pump kind) on our sink and it extends the "life" of the washing device by a few days. This seems to be long enough to do laundry and get other dish rags clean.
To sum up: use antibacterial soap to lather up the germy thing you use to wash dishes. Do this once or twice a week and no more fear of spreading germs as you clean.
Now you have to worry about creating antibacterial resistant super-germs.

-Chris

PostPosted:Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:32 am
by Rishi
C-Chamberlain wrote:Weather it's worth noting or not is up to debate but I have the problem in my house of "stinky dish rag." Where the rag has been used, left damp and became mildewy. I have found a temporary solution, which would work with the sponge issue as well, is to get it all lathered up in some antibacterial soap. We have a little bottle (pump kind) on our sink and it extends the "life" of the washing device by a few days. This seems to be long enough to do laundry and get other dish rags clean.
To sum up: use antibacterial soap to lather up the germy thing you use to wash dishes. Do this once or twice a week and no more fear of spreading germs as you clean.
Now you have to worry about creating antibacterial resistant super-germs.

-Chris


Plain soap removes (Physically, not killing) 90 to 95% of bacteria. After a soap wash soaking the object for 3 minutes in a Dettol or Savlon solution (1:40 dilution) can render the object sterile.

Incidentally, adventitious bacteria need not be pathogenic. Stinks no doubt. May even itch.

rishi

PostPosted:Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:05 pm
by C-Chamberlain
Adventitious though they may be, my wife and I feel they are better off dead and gone than stinking up my kitchen and hands... especially hands. Fascinating facts though, my thanks. I think the solution is the solution (heh heh). The Dettol or Savlon solution I mean.