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#2848
Its always painful searching things like keys, wallet, cellphone etc. Can we make some chip which is very small and can be attached to it? If we don't find them, open your computer/browser like a Google and enter the name of the item... It should give the exact location where the item is located. That would help reduce a lot of search time daily.
By colacool2003
#3010
This has been around for a very long time but It dosent use computers. It uses loud noises to tell you where it is. All you do is press a button and it will make the noise till you find what you are looking for and turn it off. ;-D
By bobdafrog
#7689
Your Idea seems pretty cool, but you would have to place a chip on every new item you buy. Even if you had the chips pre planted in some items- it would take a long while to make the switch. Also, what if the item got wet or what if there is "no service" where the item is- like in a celler. I think the beeping thing on my car keys is enough.
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By 1313
#7718
I believe there is a plan or it has been done, by a retailer. They have/plan to put a chip in all their items, this way they can track the life cycle of a particular product. I think I would hate knowing that I am being tracked when using a particular item. Mind you on the other side if it is stolen, rather than set an alarm off at the exit, why not let it lead the police to the stash!
By mikem
#9700
This is one of the big applications for RFID tags. I don't know that it is commercially available yet but it will be. The chips are really cheap and can be put in everything you own. The innovation would be in devising a clever way to locate the chips, e.g. through triangulation.
By Rishi
#9708
mikem wrote:This is one of the big applications for RFID tags. I don't know that it is commercially available yet but it will be. The chips are really cheap and can be put in everything you own. The innovation would be in devising a clever way to locate the chips, e.g. through triangulation.


RFID does not have a power supply. It works by receiving RF power radiated by the questioning RFID reader through an antenna, converting to DC, store in a capacitor, and use this power to radiate back the RFID's data through the same antenna. Currently the range is limted, and an interpreting reader is needed. The size of the antenna loop limits the minimum size of the RFID label. The labels themselves are commercially available and in use for consignment tracking.

This is not to say that the technology cannot evolve. Till then, an investment in a memory training course may have to serve.

rishi
By Rishi
#9713
The size of the antenna loop limits the minimum size of the RFID label.
This is not to say that the technology cannot evolve. Till then, an investment in a memory training course may have to serve.

rishi[/quote]

The technology has evolved. The antenna has shrunk to the size of a grain of rice. An implantable RFID chip (@USD200) is already in the market. However, some concerns re privacy remain.

The following appeared in the Washington Post:
Quote:
Use of Implanted Patient-Data Chips Stirs Debate on Medicine vs. Privacy

By Rob Stein

When Daniel Hickey's doctor suggested he have a microchip implanted under his skin to provide instant access to his computerized medical record, the 77-year-old retired naval officer immediately agreed.

To view the entire article, go to http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... ailarticle
Unquote:

rishi
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