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By showmethegadget
#8911
Have you ever got a drink on a hot day filled with lots of ice to keep it cool. But when you try and drink it the ice gets in the way of drinking it as quick as you want to. My idea is to put the ice in the glass first and add a plastic filter into the glass to trap the ice at the bottom and then pour the drink in. This is really simple but it would hold the ice at the bottom of the glass keeping the drink cool, and it would not get in the way of you drinking it.

Reward: A pat on the back
By Stewie123
#9274
thats a good idea, but only one problem people put ice in a drink to keep it cold, and cold air goes down (hot air up). So if you put the ice on the bottom only the bottom would be cold. You can just do what I do with some glasses, get them wet and place them in the freezer.
By Rishi
#9285
showmethegadget.com wrote:Have you ever got a drink on a hot day filled with lots of ice to keep it cool. But when you try and drink it the ice gets in the way of drinking it as quick as you want to. My idea is to put the ice in the glass first and add a plastic filter into the glass to trap the ice at the bottom and then pour the drink in. This is really simple but it would hold the ice at the bottom of the glass keeping the drink cool, and it would not get in the way of you drinking it.

Reward: A pat on the back


Ice and some of the food compatible plastics have a lower density than water and hence float.

How about crushed ice? Straw? Filter at the top? Or just decant the drink into another glass after it has cooled.

rishi
User avatar
By Steve
#9287
I've seen stone cubes that you can put into your freezer and then toss into the drink (just be careful not to break the glass :-b ). Wouldn't even water it down. Stewie is probably right though that anything at the bottom of the drink won't do the same job at getting it cold.
By Rishi
#9299
Steve wrote:I've seen stone cubes that you can put into your freezer and then toss into the drink (just be careful not to break the glass :-b ). Wouldn't even water it down. Stewie is probably right though that anything at the bottom of the drink won't do the same job at getting it cold.


1 cc of ice can remove 80 calories on melting. Stone has only about 1/80 of the thermal capacity of ice (specific gravity of stone is three but sp. ht. only about 0.3). This is because of the latent heat of melting of ice. In the case of a cold stone there is no change of state, hence no latent heat.

Can we consider a doble walled 'glass', which may be a plastic. The annular space can be filled with water and sealed. When such a container is frozen in the freezer and a drink poured into it, it will cool the drink, has the major advantge Steve said about not diluting the drink, and leaves you free to enjoy the drink without the floes.

rishi
By sebin
#10002
One problem if we go for a double walled glass, it becomes bulky and we dont have the pleasure of drinking.

What i suggest , a device where it chills the drink instantaneously.
you place the cup on that device and the drink gets chilled.
So the shape of the glass is maintained. And no extra additon to the glass is needed. This device can be kept on the tables of restraunts or bars.

We can also use the same device to heat the drink, like coffee or tea just by turning a knob.

The idea can be conceived by using Peltier Effect principle when current passed through junction of two dissimillar metals, temperature rises at one junction and temperature is reduced at other junction .
By Rishi
#10004
sebin wrote:One problem if we go for a double walled glass, it becomes bulky and we dont have the pleasure of drinking.

What i suggest , a device where it chills the drink instantaneously.
you place the cup on that device and the drink gets chilled.
So the shape of the glass is maintained. And no extra additon to the glass is needed. This device can be kept on the tables of restraunts or bars.

We can also use the same device to heat the drink, like coffee or tea just by turning a knob.

The idea can be conceived by using Peltier Effect principle when current passed through junction of two dissimillar metals, temperature rises at one junction and temperature is reduced at other junction .


There is the matter of heat transfer coefficient, which limits the rate of heating or cooling. The insulating nature of glass combined with the air film between the cold surface and the glass, and the liquid film inside the glass will effectively slow down the cooling rate. If you make the glass itself out of a Peltier chip (Which is feasible) and plug it into a suitable outlet, you can avoid two of these resistances and may achieve the desired cooling. The downside is that the outer surface will get hot.

rishi
By Rishi
#10005
sebin wrote:One problem if we go for a double walled glass, it becomes bulky and we dont have the pleasure of drinking.

What i suggest , a device where it chills the drink instantaneously.
you place the cup on that device and the drink gets chilled.
So the shape of the glass is maintained. And no extra additon to the glass is needed. This device can be kept on the tables of restraunts or bars.

We can also use the same device to heat the drink, like coffee or tea just by turning a knob.

The idea can be conceived by using Peltier Effect principle when current passed through junction of two dissimillar metals, temperature rises at one junction and temperature is reduced at other junction .


There is the matter of heat transfer coefficient, which limits the rate of heating or cooling. The insulating nature of glass combined with the air film between the cold surface and the glass, and the liquid film inside the glass will effectively slow down the cooling rate. If you make the glass itself out of a Peltier chip (Which is feasible) and plug it into a suitable outlet, you can avoid two of these resistances and may achieve the desired cooling. The downside is that the outer surface will get hot.

rishi
By sebin
#10022
When i saw the picture( fig -2) in this link.

http://www.digit-life.com/articles/peltiercoolers/

When the current flows from 'n' to 'p' cooling occurs and when it flows from 'p' to 'n' the heating occurs.

So what i say is why not not just use 'n' to 'p' juctions connected parallely. So that only cooling occurs and since ther is no heating junction there will not be any heating effect.

and i have submitted one idea regarding CPU heating. We can seeback effect to generate electricity from the heat.
By Rishi
#10025
sebin wrote:When i saw the picture( fig -2) in this link.

http://www.digit-life.com/articles/peltiercoolers/

When the current flows from 'n' to 'p' cooling occurs and when it flows from 'p' to 'n' the heating occurs.

So what i say is why not not just use 'n' to 'p' juctions connected parallely. So that only cooling occurs and since ther is no heating junction there will not be any heating effect.

and i have submitted one idea regarding CPU heating. We can seeback effect to generate electricity from the heat.


Your idea for quick production of cold when needed is good.

Using a Peltier effect device for both cooling and heating is commercially viable. Phillips even marketted a combination cooler/heater flasks for a while way back in the 60s.

The problem of quickly cooling of a glass of liquid is the mechanism of heat transfer unrelated to the method of producing the cold.

You can consider making a battery powered 'Cold Finger', with which you can directly stir the liquid in the glass. The act of stirring improves the heat transfer a lot, one barrier (bottom of the glass) is eliminated, and the contents will not be diluted as will happen if ice cubes are used. The top of the device can be finned to radiate the heat generated at the other junction of the Peltier device.

Rishi
By sebin
#10026
Thats exactly what i thought...using cold finger type...

But is that product available in the market?
If not its a really good method for cooling.

What abt the other suggestion reagarding the use of seeback effect for power generation using CPU heat.
By Rishi
#10039
sebin wrote:Thats exactly what i thought...using cold finger type...

But is that product available in the market?
If not its a really good method for cooling.

What abt the other suggestion reagarding the use of seeback effect for power generation using CPU heat.


Cold fingers are common. However, they are not very portable. They are laboratory devices that use cold water circulating through a 'thumb' for local cooling. Probably you can go ahead with your concept of a portable device based on a Peltier chip.

The only issue is that the element has to be produced in a tubular shape with the hot junction inside and the cold one on the outside. The inner surface has to have the heat removed. For this to be fast you may think of using a heat pipe that extends above ending in a finned radiator.

The second problem is the power. To cool a 200 ml volume of liquid from 25 degC to 10 degC you need about 6 watts at 100% efficiency. This would completely drain two mtal hydride AA cells of 2.5 Amp. Hr. capacity. You will have to recharge fully for the next shot of cooling. Any thing more than twoo AA cells may prove too bulky.

Battery technology is advancing. You may have to put in some serious design effort from this point on if you are thinking of commercializing your idea. Or sell the idea to any consumer goods or liquor manufacturer.

Somewhat similar considerations apply to producing power from CPU heat. If you do a detailed calculation you will find that it is not commercially viable.

rishi
By Biggofwi
#10436
Theres a substance thats been out forever called heavy water. It utilizes carbon to make it weigh more then normal water. It's great for bets but its runs around 35 bucks for a bottle. Its best that you take enought bets so you even out.
By Rishi
#10437
Biggofwi wrote:Theres a substance thats been out forever called heavy water. It utilizes carbon to make it weigh more then normal water. It's great for bets but its runs around 35 bucks for a bottle. Its best that you take enought bets so you even out.


Heavy water is Deuterium Oxide. It has no carbon. The molecule is made of one molecule of the second isotope of Hydrogen called Deuterium, which has double the molecular weight of hydrogen, and one atom of oxygen.

However, the density of heavy water is slightly more than 1.1. Heavy ice might be more than 1 and may sink. Heavy ice melts at 3.8 Celsius, about 4 degrees C warmer than the regular ice.

Some experiments done on rats, whose bodies were heavy water based, show that they do not reproduce. Better find out about side effects before rushing out to buy heavy ice.

rishi
By Biggofwi
#10441
You a scientist or something? thanks for correcting me, at least i know it sinks though.
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